Monday’s Photography Inspiration – John Carbutt

John Carbutt as a photographic pioneer, stereo card publisher, and photographic entrepreneur. He was the first person to use celluloid for photographic film and to market dry-plate glass negative. He was born in Sheffield, England on 2 December 1832 and moved to Chicago in 1853. Carbutt founded the Keystone Dry Plate Works in 1879 and was the first to develop…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Lai Afong

Lai Afong was a Chinese photographer who established Afong Studio, one of the early photographic studios in Hong Kong. Lai Afong was born in Gaoming, Guangdong and arrived in Hong Kong in the 1850s as a refugee of the Taiping Rebellion.  It is not known how he learned the wet-plate collodion process, but, it is said that by as early as 1859 had…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – John Albok

John Albok was a Hungarian photographer who documented street scenes in New York City during the Great Depression and later. John Albok was born in Munkacs, Hungary, in what is now the Ukraine. From the ages of 13 to 17, he trained was a tailor’s apprentice and was later drafted into the Hungarian army. He began…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Kassian Cephas

Kassian Cephas was a Javanese photographer of the court of the Yogyakarta Sultanate. He was the first indigenous person from Indonesia to become a professional photographer and was trained at the request of Sultan Hamengkubuwana VI (r. 1855–1877). As a youth, Cephas became a pupil of Protestant Christian missionary Christina Petronella Philips-Steven and followed her to nearby Bagelen, Purworejo….

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Thomas Andrew

Thomas Andrew was a New Zealand photographer who was born in Takapuna in 1855, a suburb in Auckland on the North Island of New Zealand. He worked as a photographer in Napier. He later opened a studio in Auckland which was destroyed by fire. In 1891, he went to Samoa where he worked with two other New Zealand photographers, Alfred John…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Fred Bremner

Fred Bremner was a Scottish photographer. He was born in 1863 in Aberchirder (also known as Foggylone) in Scotland and was one of several sons of a photographer in Banff. He left school at the age of thirteen to join his father’s studio and worked there for six years.  In 1882, Bremner accepted an offer of work from his brother-in-law G….

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Joseph Byron

Joseph Byron was an English photographer who founded the Byron Company in Manhattan. He was born in January 1847 in England. He was born into a family of photographers. He began his career as an event and documentary photographer in the glass negative era. Joseph Byron made the stage picture a fixture in the lobbies…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Ivan Standl

Ivan Standl was one of the first professional photographers in Zagreb, present-day Croatia. He is known mostly for his award-winning documentary work and the author of the first Croatian photobook, published in 1870. Ivan Standl was of Czech descent and was born in Prague in 1832. It is not known for certain when he moved…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Geraldine Moodie

Geraldine Moodie was a Canadian photographer who pioneered in capturing photos of early Canadian history. She was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1854. She married John Douglas Moodie in England in 1878 and the couple first moved to western Canada, and they briefly farmed in Manitoba, then moved to Ottawa in 1885. Living in rural Canada at…

Monday Photography Inspiration – Gjon Mili

Gjon Mili was an Albanian photographer from Korça born in November 28, 1904. Mili spent his childhood in Romania, attending Gheorghe Lazăr National College in Bucharest, and migrating to the United States in 1923. He studied electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Upon graduation in 1927, he worked for Westinghouse as a lighting research engineer until 1938. Through experiments…