Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey

Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey was a French photographer and draughtsman who was active in the Middle East. His daguerreotypes are the earliest surviving photographs of Greece, Palestine, Egypt, Syria and Turkey. Remarkably, his photographs were only discovered in the 1920s in a storeroom of his estate and then only became known eighty years later. Girault…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – George Rodger

George Rodger was a British photojournalist noted for his work in Africa and for taking photographs of the death camps at Bergen-Belsen at the end of the Second World War. He was born in Hale, Cheshire in 1908 and spent his childhood in Cheshire and in Scotland. He attended St. Bee’s College, Cumbria but left…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Jean Dieuzaide

“My inward joy is to look at the interplays of light and photograh them… Without light, nothing exists, and there is no more liberty.” – Jean Dieuzaide Jean Dieuzaide was a French photographer who was born in n Grenade, Haute-Garonne in 1921. At 13, he was given a cardboard Coronet 6 x 9 camera. He attended…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Martine Frank

“I feel concerned at what is happening in the world, and involved in what surrounds me. I do not wish merely to “document”, I want to know why a certain thing bothers me or attracts me, and how a situation can affect the person involved,” – Martine Franck  Martine Frank was a British-Belgian documentary photographer…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Antoine Claudet

Antoine Claudet Born in La Croix-Rousse, France in 1798. Early in his career Claudet headed a glass factory at Choisy-le-Roi, Paris, together with Georges Bontemps. He then moved to England in 1827 to promote the factory with a shop in High Holborn, London. In 1839, his attention was caught by the excitement over the daguerreotype and, in the midst of legal wrangling over…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Roman Vishniac

“I was living in Germany in the thirties, and I knew that Hitler had made it his mission to exterminate all Jews, especially the children and the women who could bear children in the future. I was unable to save my people, only their memory.” – Roman Vishniac Roman Vishniac  was one of the foremost…

Looking up for a view

When it comes to architecture, looking up is inevitable. Especially in a place like London with all of its skyscrapers. Sooner or later, you end up pointing your camera towards the sky. Some architectural elements can also only reveal their full effect when viewed from below. This particular view demonstrates how powerful this perspective is…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Leigh Wiener

“Photographing people is unquestionably the most difficult form of still photography there is. It’s the only area of still photography where the photographer must be a very keen student of psychology. A portrait is not a duplication of a face. A portrait is the revelation of a person. You want to tell something about the…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Helen Levitt

“I never had a project. I would go out and shoot, follow my eyes – what they noticed, I tried to capture with my camera, for others to see.” Helen Levitt Helen Levitt was an American photographer born on August 31st, 1913. She was born in Levitt was born in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York and was considered to…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Lewis Hine

“Photography can light-up darkness and expose ignorance” – Lewis Hine Lewis Hine was an American Photographer born September 26, 1874, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, U.S. He used his art to bring social ills to public attention. After his father was killed in an accident, Hine began working and saved his money for a college education. He studied sociology at…