Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Hugues Krafft

Hugues Krafft was a photographer born in Paris, 1853. He travelled around the world, and visited Japan in 1882–1883. He left numerous quality photographs of the period. He was among the first to use instantaneous photography in Japan. He used a Zeiss camera with gelatine-silver bromide plates, a process which became widely available in 1880,…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Henry Taunt

Henry Taunt was a professional photographer, author, publisher and entertainer based in Oxford, England. He was born in Penson’s Gardens in the parish of St Ebbe’s, Oxford. Taunt first worked for his father, but decided he did not want to become a plumber. From the age of 11, Taunt worked first for a tailor, then for…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Frank Jay Haynes

Frank Jay Haynes known as F. Jay, was a professional photographer who played a major role in documenting through photographs the settlement and early history of the great Northwest. He was born on October 28, 1853 in Saline, Michigan. As a small boy, his family moved east to Detroit, Michigan. where F. Jay worked in his father’s…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – William Bell

William H. Bell was an English-born American photographer born in Liverpool, England, in 1830. He was known for his photographs of western landscapes taken as part of the Wheeler expedition in 1872. He also wrote articles on the dry plate process and other techniques for various photography journals. He immigrated to the United States with his…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Robert Heinecken

“There is a vast difference between taking a picture and making a photograph.” – Robert Heinecken Robert Heinecken was an American artist who referred to himself as a “paraphotographer” because he so often made photographic images without a camera. He was born in Denver in 1931, and grew up in Riverside, California. He joined the Navy in…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg was primarily known as a great American poet, the figurehead of the Beat Movement. But from the early 1950s to about 1964, Ginsberg regularly used a cheap camera to take snapshots of his now famous pals, including the writers Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Gregory Corso, and Neal Cassady.  Almost all are affectionate, more…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Charles Roscoe Savage

Charles Roscoe Savage was a British landscape photographer born in Southampton on August 16, 1832 who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad. His journey into photography was a very interesting one. At the age of four, his clothing caught on…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Alexander Gardner

Alexander Gardner was a Scottish photographer was born in Paisley, Renfrewshire, on 17 October 1821. He became an apprentice jeweler at the age of 14, lasting seven years. Gardner was raised in the Church of Scotland and influenced by the work of Robert Owen, Welsh socialist and father of the cooperative movement. By adulthood he desired to create a cooperative community…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Joseph Byron

Joseph Byron was an English photographer who founded the Byron Company in Manhattan. He was born in January 1847 in England. He was born into a family of photographers. He began his career as an event and documentary photographer in the glass negative era. Joseph Byron made the stage picture a fixture in the lobbies…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Herman Salzwedel

Herman Salzwedel was a photographer in Java, Dutch East Indies during the late 19th century. Salzwedel arrived in Batavia in May 1877, Dutch East Indies via Singapore. He founded the firm Salzwedel and from March 1878 worked for a year with the more experienced Van Kinsbergen in the photographic studio Kinsbergen & Salzwedel in Batavia….