Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Louis Boutan

Louis Boutan was a French biologist and a pioneer in the field of underwater photography that would be unmatched by anyone else for decades. He was born in Versailles and studied biology and natural history at the University of Paris where he became a lab assistant at the age of 20. In 1880, he was named deputy head by…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Augustín Víctor Casasola

Agustín Víctor Casasola was a Mexican photographer and partial founder of the Mexican Association of Press Photographers. He was born in Mexico City on July 28,1874 and apprenticed as a typographer. He later became a reporter for El Imparicial, which was one of the official newspapers of the Díaz government. Typography demands precision, a sense…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Leslie Gill

Leslie Gill among a group of photographers who elevated the editorial still life photograph to a unique American art form. Gill studied painting with Charles Hawthorne in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and graduated with honours from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1929. While working as art director of House Beautiful magazine, Gill began to make his own…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – John Carbutt

John Carbutt as a photographic pioneer, stereo card publisher, and photographic entrepreneur. He was the first person to use celluloid for photographic film and to market dry-plate glass negative. He was born in Sheffield, England on 2 December 1832 and moved to Chicago in 1853. Carbutt founded the Keystone Dry Plate Works in 1879 and was the first to develop…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Henry Taunt

Henry Taunt was a professional photographer, author, publisher and entertainer based in Oxford, England. He was born in Penson’s Gardens in the parish of St Ebbe’s, Oxford. Taunt first worked for his father, but decided he did not want to become a plumber. From the age of 11, Taunt worked first for a tailor, then for…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Robert Heinecken

“There is a vast difference between taking a picture and making a photograph.” – Robert Heinecken Robert Heinecken was an American artist who referred to himself as a “paraphotographer” because he so often made photographic images without a camera. He was born in Denver in 1931, and grew up in Riverside, California. He joined the Navy in…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg was primarily known as a great American poet, the figurehead of the Beat Movement. But from the early 1950s to about 1964, Ginsberg regularly used a cheap camera to take snapshots of his now famous pals, including the writers Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Gregory Corso, and Neal Cassady.  Almost all are affectionate, more…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – James Bragge

James Bragge was a well known and respected photographer in New Zealand during the mid-to-late 19th century. He was born in South Shields, Durham, England. As a young man, he was a cabinet maker. It was only with the advancement in technology that during the early sixties he was able to engage in photography. It…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Charles Roscoe Savage

Charles Roscoe Savage was a British landscape photographer born in Southampton on August 16, 1832 who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad. His journey into photography was a very interesting one. At the age of four, his clothing caught on…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Carleton E. Watkins

Carleton Watkins is considered to be one of greatest photographers of the American West. Carleton E. Watkins was born on November 11, 1829 in  Oneonta, New York, he was a hunter and fisherman and was involved in the glee club and Presbyterian Church Choir. Lured by the opportunities of the California gold rush, he traveled…