Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Augustín Víctor Casasola

Agustín Víctor Casasola was a Mexican photographer and partial founder of the Mexican Association of Press Photographers. He was born in Mexico City on July 28,1874 and apprenticed as a typographer. He later became a reporter for El Imparicial, which was one of the official newspapers of the Díaz government. Typography demands precision, a sense…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Leslie Gill

Leslie Gill among a group of photographers who elevated the editorial still life photograph to a unique American art form. Gill studied painting with Charles Hawthorne in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and graduated with honours from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1929. While working as art director of House Beautiful magazine, Gill began to make his own…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Kassian Cephas

Kassian Cephas was a Javanese photographer of the court of the Yogyakarta Sultanate. He was the first indigenous person from Indonesia to become a professional photographer and was trained at the request of Sultan Hamengkubuwana VI (r. 1855–1877). As a youth, Cephas became a pupil of Protestant Christian missionary Christina Petronella Philips-Steven and followed her to nearby Bagelen, Purworejo….

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Thomas Andrew

Thomas Andrew was a New Zealand photographer who was born in Takapuna in 1855, a suburb in Auckland on the North Island of New Zealand. He worked as a photographer in Napier. He later opened a studio in Auckland which was destroyed by fire. In 1891, he went to Samoa where he worked with two other New Zealand photographers, Alfred John…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Francis Bedford

Francis Bedford was an English photographer born in 1815 in 1815. He began his career as an architectural draughtsman and lithographer, before taking up photography in the early 1850s. He was one of England’s most prominent landscape photographers and the first to accompany a royal tour. He helped to found the Royal Photographic Society in 1853….

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Roger Fenton

Roger Fenton was a British photographer born in August 1819, noted as one of the first war photographers. He was born in Crimble Hall, Heywood, Lancashire into a wealthy family. He was the fourth of seven children. Roger Fenton is a towering figure in the history of photography, the most celebrated and influential photographer in England during the…

Monday Photography Inspiration – John Dominis

“I didn’t think it was a big news event… I was expecting a normal ceremony. I hardly noticed what was happening when I was shooting.” – John Dominis Dominis was an American documentary photographer, war photographer and photojournalist born on June 27, 1921 in Los Angeles, California. He began his career in photography while he…

Monday Photography Inspiration – Edouard Boubat

“The wandering photographer sees the same show that everyone else sees. He, however, stops to watch it.” – Edouard Boubat Edouard Boubat was a French Post-War photographer known for his poetic images of nature, animals, and portraits. He was born on September 13, 1923 Montmartre, Paris. In 1938, Boubat, attended the École Estienne, where he studied…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Timothy H. O’Sullivan

Timothy H. O’Sullivan was a photographer born in 1840. He was widely known for his work related to the American Civil War. O’Sullivan’s history and personal life remains a mystery. O’Sullivan began his photography career as an apprentice in Mathew Brady’s Fulton Street gallery in New York City and then moved on to the Washington, D.C., branch managed by…

Monday Photography Inspiration – Lászlo Moholy-Nagy

“The enemy of photography is the convention, the fixed rules of ‘how to do’. The salvation of photography comes from the experiment.” – Lászlo Moholy – Nagy László Moholy-Nagy was a Hungarian painter and photographer born in July 2, 1895. László attended a gymnasium school in the city of Szeged, which was the second-largest city in the country….