Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg was primarily known as a great American poet, the figurehead of the Beat Movement. But from the early 1950s to about 1964, Ginsberg regularly used a cheap camera to take snapshots of his now famous pals, including the writers Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Gregory Corso, and Neal Cassady.  Almost all are affectionate, more…

Expectations

Expectation is such a big thing when we head out to capture image. The pressure get even worse when we have a particular outcome in mind and time is of the essence. The question that I have for you today is whether our expectations are realistic. Personally, I only have the luxury of heading out…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – James Bragge

James Bragge was a well known and respected photographer in New Zealand during the mid-to-late 19th century. He was born in South Shields, Durham, England. As a young man, he was a cabinet maker. It was only with the advancement in technology that during the early sixties he was able to engage in photography. It…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Charles Roscoe Savage

Charles Roscoe Savage was a British landscape photographer born in Southampton on August 16, 1832 who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad. His journey into photography was a very interesting one. At the age of four, his clothing caught on…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Carleton E. Watkins

Carleton Watkins is considered to be one of greatest photographers of the American West. Carleton E. Watkins was born on November 11, 1829 in  Oneonta, New York, he was a hunter and fisherman and was involved in the glee club and Presbyterian Church Choir. Lured by the opportunities of the California gold rush, he traveled…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – John Albok

John Albok was a Hungarian photographer who documented street scenes in New York City during the Great Depression and later. John Albok was born in Munkacs, Hungary, in what is now the Ukraine. From the ages of 13 to 17, he trained was a tailor’s apprentice and was later drafted into the Hungarian army. He began…

Patience

It is a very rare occasion that I get to process my images within 24hrs of capture. Some photographers prefer to process their images straight after capture. I prefer to wait and I’ve learned that being patient has its own results. They are several reasons as to why this process works for me. There are…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Ernö Vadas

Ernö Vadas one of the most successful photographers of the interbellum. He studied photography with Rudolf Balogh. His photos are characterised by the bold use of light and shadow. In 1934, readers of the magazine Die Galerie awarded Vadas first prize, and the Royal Photographic Society awarded him its Emerson Medal. In 1938, the American…

Expression, Perspectives and Timing

As individuals, we are all different. I am an introvert and an over thinker. I can force myself into into social situations. However, I am not one for small talks as I find small talks draining. Somehow I have found myself in the creative world and creating a blog and permanently putting my thoughts out…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Kassian Cephas

Kassian Cephas was a Javanese photographer of the court of the Yogyakarta Sultanate. He was the first indigenous person from Indonesia to become a professional photographer and was trained at the request of Sultan Hamengkubuwana VI (r. 1855–1877). As a youth, Cephas became a pupil of Protestant Christian missionary Christina Petronella Philips-Steven and followed her to nearby Bagelen, Purworejo….