Monday’s Photography Inspiration – John Carbutt

John Carbutt as a photographic pioneer, stereo card publisher, and photographic entrepreneur. He was the first person to use celluloid for photographic film and to market dry-plate glass negative. He was born in Sheffield, England on 2 December 1832 and moved to Chicago in 1853. Carbutt founded the Keystone Dry Plate Works in 1879 and was the first to develop…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Lai Afong

Lai Afong was a Chinese photographer who established Afong Studio, one of the early photographic studios in Hong Kong. Lai Afong was born in Gaoming, Guangdong and arrived in Hong Kong in the 1850s as a refugee of the Taiping Rebellion.  It is not known how he learned the wet-plate collodion process, but, it is said that by as early as 1859 had…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Hugues Krafft

Hugues Krafft was a photographer born in Paris, 1853. He travelled around the world, and visited Japan in 1882–1883. He left numerous quality photographs of the period. He was among the first to use instantaneous photography in Japan. He used a Zeiss camera with gelatine-silver bromide plates, a process which became widely available in 1880,…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Henry Taunt

Henry Taunt was a professional photographer, author, publisher and entertainer based in Oxford, England. He was born in Penson’s Gardens in the parish of St Ebbe’s, Oxford. Taunt first worked for his father, but decided he did not want to become a plumber. From the age of 11, Taunt worked first for a tailor, then for…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Frank Jay Haynes

Frank Jay Haynes known as F. Jay, was a professional photographer who played a major role in documenting through photographs the settlement and early history of the great Northwest. He was born on October 28, 1853 in Saline, Michigan. As a small boy, his family moved east to Detroit, Michigan. where F. Jay worked in his father’s…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – William Bell

William H. Bell was an English-born American photographer born in Liverpool, England, in 1830. He was known for his photographs of western landscapes taken as part of the Wheeler expedition in 1872. He also wrote articles on the dry plate process and other techniques for various photography journals. He immigrated to the United States with his…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg was primarily known as a great American poet, the figurehead of the Beat Movement. But from the early 1950s to about 1964, Ginsberg regularly used a cheap camera to take snapshots of his now famous pals, including the writers Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs, Gregory Corso, and Neal Cassady.  Almost all are affectionate, more…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – James Bragge

James Bragge was a well known and respected photographer in New Zealand during the mid-to-late 19th century. He was born in South Shields, Durham, England. As a young man, he was a cabinet maker. It was only with the advancement in technology that during the early sixties he was able to engage in photography. It…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Charles Roscoe Savage

Charles Roscoe Savage was a British landscape photographer born in Southampton on August 16, 1832 who produced images of the American West. He is best known for his 1869 photographs of the linking of the first transcontinental railroad. His journey into photography was a very interesting one. At the age of four, his clothing caught on…

Monday’s Photography Inspiration – Carleton E. Watkins

Carleton Watkins is considered to be one of greatest photographers of the American West. Carleton E. Watkins was born on November 11, 1829 in  Oneonta, New York, he was a hunter and fisherman and was involved in the glee club and Presbyterian Church Choir. Lured by the opportunities of the California gold rush, he traveled…